A milestone of sorts

I don’t want to jinx myself , so I’ll try to keep this post short and to the point. Today makes 6 full months that Ive been hospital free!

May not sound like a big deal to some, but believe me, for me…it is! By comparison, last year I was hospitalized 5 times, (or appx once every 2.5 months) …a record even for me. The year before that wasn’t much better at 4 admissions.
Even during a so called “good breathing” year, I usually end up in the pokey at least once or twice, so wouldn’t it be something if I could go an entire year with NO ADMISSIONS!!! Oh my god…..UCSFs Respiratory Dept would go out of business.

I really don’t know what to attribute this success to. My disease hasn’t gotten any better, on the contrary…my PFTs are actually worse, but I think I’m getting a little better at quashing the minor flare-ups before they turn into big ones. It could also be that I’m doing a better of job of avoiding some of the environmental triggers , which probably aggravate my symptoms. A few months ago I totally re-did my sleeping space. I now keep that area of the house pet free, dust free and I think for the most part, allergen free . I even have one of those Ionic breeze things to filter the air.

Even more than just reducing my exposure to certain triggers, I think it’s the methods I use to cope with my disease that have changed. Subconsciously I think Ive raised the bar as to what I consider to be a ” hospital worthy” exacerbation. Severe breathing flare-ups that would have landed me in the ER just a year ago, Ive now somehow managed to tough out at home without all the hospital intervention and drama. Probably not the smartest thing to do for a high risk asthmatic, but I suppose its a way for me to maintain some kind of control over my own life.

Whatever the reason, I’m certainly grateful for the reprieve. One less day spent in the hospital, is one more day I can spend living like a normal person….whatever the heck that is.

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3 Comments

  1. gaylemyrna says:

    Way to go!! I am no where near your level of compromised lung function, but have my own degree of lung crapiness. So far this year I have avoided any major exacerbations, except for my two night hospitalization in January with a bacteria bronchitis. I have a lot of plans the next few months, so I hope my lungs don’t have their own fickle agenda :-)) !
    Take care,
    GayleMyrna

  2. Sus says:

    Have to say, Steve, there’s a whole lot of truth in your having ‘redone your seep space’ bit. Since we remodelled last Autumn our house has been such a happy healthy building that even I haven’t been that sick!
    I have noticed the difference now the paint is new, the windows are new, the flooring is new…..we did practically rebuild! But no more dust, or rather, hardly any dust in comparison to before, no more mould in the corners of the room, windows, under the flooring in the bathrooms-none of which I had realised was there, but all of which was possibly contributing to my constant flare up in some sweet way!
    The simple practicalities of life!

    Hope you keep well, pal.

    We’re in PS-doing me the world of good. Can you believe I’ve gone up by 100 points on my PEF in just a few days!

    Sus xx

  3. Kerri says:

    Yay!! I was eyeing your blinking counter and waiting to see when you hit the six month mark!

    Although I read the article on the 2nd when you tweeted about it, I also got the HealthCentral e-newsletter today, and, what do you know, it’s about you!

    Have fun in Boston!

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