Alin

I probably sound like a broken record when I say this, but it’s true… I might have crappy lungs, but it’s because of those crappy lungs that I’ve been able to meet so many wonderful and interesting people.
My friend Alin certainly fits in that category.

Alin has Autism, Spastic Quadriplegia Cerebral Palsy and an extremely rare condition that effects his heart and lungs, called Hypothalamic Dysfunction, Hypoventilation and Autonomic Dysregulation or (ROHHAD). Because of his condition, he has to be connected to a ventilator every night and occasionally during the day to help him breath.

Alin is an intelligent, articulate individual with a love for all things technical and tactile. He considers himself a nerd of sorts, and for good reason. He’s a near genius when it comes to computers and is also a bonafide Stock Market expert. He became fascinated with stock trading at a young age and found out he had a real knack for picking winning stocks. He’s also active in the ATIA, and in 2010 was a guest speaker at their annual conference.

Alin’s story is both heart breaking and inspiring. He’s an incredibly positive and upbeat person considering everything he’s been through in his short life. He’s had countless medical procedures done and last year had to have a tracheostomy put in. Thanks in part to a loving adoptive family, Alin thrives despite his disabilities.

What I like about Alin, is that what you see is what you get. He’s brutally honest and tells you exactly what’s on his mind. He’s very open about his condition and is not afraid to show off what it has done to his body. He’s the only other person I know who posts his bronchoscopy photos and other personal medical stuff. When I first made contact with him it was like a competition to see who had the most graphic medical photos. Hands down, Alin is the winner in that area.

Anywho (as Alin would say), if you’re so inclined, stop by Alins site and tell him Steve sent you :-) And while you’re there, give him a big hug….He loves Hugs!

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8 Comments

  1. kerri says:

    Incidentally enough, I was checking out your blogroll yesterday and stumbled over to his site :). It's definitely a GREAT read, and I gathered most of the above about his personality by reading just a few entries — i'm definitely going to be following his site from now on!

    Thanks for sharing! I'll def be sure to give him a virtual hug next time I swing by! :)

  2. Misty says:

    HI. My daughter also has ROHHAD. I will definitely stop over to see Alin! thanks

  3. Misty says:

    I also am the one that wrote up the information on ROHHAD to the GARD web site you refer to! thank you!!

  4. alin says:

    Very cool Kerri and Misty!

  5. mhwbcw92 says:

    Hi… what's your genetic mutation?? I am mom to a daughter with Rett.

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