Gotta whole lot a walking to do

It’s now or never –I’ve got some serious walking to do.

If all goes well, I’ll be kicking off my Boston marathon training this Saturday with a 10 mile bridge to bridge walk in San Francisco. For the next 12 weeks (lungs permitting), I will be walking my ass off, and in the process will rack up close to 300 miles. From this point on, I will need to focus a 100% of my attention on my training , so I’ll probably be blogging less frequently. I will however, post a weekly update of my progress.

I’ll be following the training template below. Because I’m already a month behind, I’ll be entering at the 3rd week of the schedule and finishing on the 16th. To cram this much this training into such a short period, will definitely be a challenge.


(click to enlarge)

As with previous training sessions, I’ll be doing most of my lsds (long slow distance) walks, in San Francisco along the waterfront and Golden Gate Bridge, and my shorter 3-5 mile tempo walks, in Crockett, California on the Al Zampa Bridge.

So you might be asking , why is all this training and preparation so important for someone who is only walking a marathon vs running one? Well, 26 miles…. is 26 miles, whether you run it, walk it, or crawl it. It’s not like you’re given a week to complete the race. If that were the case, anyone could do a marathon. I have 7 hours to cross the finish line at the Boston marathon, which equals a pace of about 16 min/mile. If you’re not quite sure how fast that this, just imagine walking at a brisk pace, non-stop, for 7 + hours. I assure you it’s not easy, even for people who prepare for it. The average body is not build to withstand the stress of trekking 42 thousand meters without a break. No matter how healthy you are, you need to train for these kinds of races.
Then there’s this little problem I have with my lungs. My lung function is less than 50% to begin with, and on top of that, I have very severe asthma. Put all these things together and you can see why training for a marathon is such a big deal for me.

Ive only been out of the hospital for 2 weeks now, and because my shortness of breath and exercise tolerance have worsened this past year, until I know how my body is going to react to some of these upcoming training walks, I can’t really say with certainty, if I’ll be up to the task of completing, what would be my 7th marathon and last marathon.

Preparing for an event like the Boston marathon also requires a huge commitment of time, money and sweat. For this reason, I’m not going to make a final decision about my participation in the race until Jan 30th. Here’s hoping for a green light.

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3 Comments

  1. Danielle says:

    Wow, you certainly are up against a huge challenge. I hadn't realized Boston was coming up so quickly. Best of luck, you can be sure I'll be cheering for you all the way!!

  2. kerri says:

    Good luck, Steve! I very much hope you're able to participate in that lucky number 7 marathon!! :)

  3. Amy says:

    "Then there’s this little problem I have with my lungs."

    Two weeks out of the hospital, training for a marathon again, AND cracking jokes to boot.

    You're crazy and amazing, my friend.

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