SARP podcast

Interesting article from a 2008 SARP study, titled…

“More than a Matter of Degree: Severe Asthma May Be a Different Form of the Disease”.

Seems to answer a lot of questions Ive always wondered about.

Dr Sorkness does a great job of explaining the basics of asthma as well as the research the SARP is doing, in trying to find out what makes the severe form of the disease different from the milder forms.

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3 Comments

  1. susannah says:

    Good interview-I listened most attentively!
    I'll be so interested in the results they gather from your guinea pig studies.

    All the best for the R & R

    Sus x

  2. Zhonggao Wang says:

    Extremely happy to read severe asthma is more than a matter of degree, severe asthma may be a different form of disease.

    I experienced severe asthma, it was diagnosed as GERD and cured by fundoplication.
    From 2006, a center for GERD was created, more than 2000 have been treaded by Radiofrequency or fundaplication with good results.
    Welcome Prof. Ronald Sorkness or SARP come to visit us.

    Wang ZG. It is gastroesophageal reflux disease, but not asthma: a case report. Chin Med Sci, 2006,21:189
    Gao X, Wang ZG. Radiofrequency for respiratory symptoms due to GERD. Chin Med J 2011;124:1006

  3. Thank you for your comment. I will forward your comments to the SARP researchers at the University of Pittsburgh.

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Most frequently asked question

"Can you have an asthma attack with a normal sat reading"?
The answer is..YES!
While it's a little unusual to see a person with a perfect O2 sat of a 100% during a severe exacerbation, its pretty typical to see sats in the 94-97% range. The reason for this, is that asthma is a disease of the airways , not the alveoli where gas exchange takes place. Most asthmatics dont desaturate during the early stages of an attack,unless theres a secondary problem such as pneumonia. You have to be extremely ill with asthma if your sats are low.

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