The OTHER Breathinsteven

His human name is Steve Ferkau, and his story is truly amazing.


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7 Comments

  1. mymusicallungs says:

    Thank you, Steve G for posting Steve F's story. What makes that video even more heart wrenching to watch and so very, very special, is that he knows who his donor is.
    In the UK you do not find out who your donor is, but you are given the chance to write a letter of thanks in memorium to the donor's family. It is all handled by your transplant co-ordinator. I can see how very special this young lady is to him, and really, makes his story even more moving than perhaps the other transplant stories I have followed. I wish him well.
    And I wish you well on your journey through these thoughts and decisions at what must be an extremely difficult time. God Bless x

  2. kerri says:

    You awesome Steves make me get teary, you know that? Thanks to both of you for sharing. <3

    I think every transplant success story is truly amazing, but with knowing who your donor was when she was in this life, Steven, is simply incredible–that you're able to share her story and yours together . . . and share that almost anyone can make a huge difference and save a life by being an organ donor.
    I signed a donor card four years ago, and it's one of my favourite decisions to talk to people about [in grade eleven, I ordered a ton of organ donor cards that I distributed to my bio class... and still find myself giving them to people when the discussion comes up :-)].

  3. Part I — Hey BreathinStephen! Thanks for thinking my story is amazing — I hope you know the feeling is mutual… I've been reading about you for years and I've been in awe of your accomplishments!!!

    MyMusicalLungs — we don't get to know our donors by default — it's actually on the unusual side… And my journey started with the same anonymous letter that you mentioned… And yes — the young lady is very special to me… It is my life's mission to tell everyone I can possibly tell about her — one beautiful side effect is that my telling others about Kari, also helps people understand the goodness of organ donation…

  4. Part II — And Kerri — I love your name — the one I know spells hers a little differently, but pronounces it the same… Thank you for signing your donor card — it means a lot to both of us BreathinStev/phens… My Kari was a star middle-hitter on her volleyball team in high school — her school retired her number, 13, when she passed — she was buried with her uniform… And as special as it is to be able to tell others about her — can you imagine what I feel like, every February, when seven of her volleyball teammates drive hundreds of miles from Iowa and Minnesota to Chicago to join my team and climb with me?!?!

    Y'all take care — and BreathinStephen, thank you the honor of having my video posted on your blog…

    Love, Steve

  5. Elisheva says:

    Thanks for posting this! It's amazing to see the kinds of miracles modern medicine can accomlish. I'm all for organ donation and am a registered donor myself.

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