Training Complete!

Taking a short break during an 18 miler on the Golden Gate bridge to mug for the camera.

Rather than rehash what Ive already been documenting on Dailymile for the last 4 months, I’ll just cut to the chase. I’ve successfully completed ALL of my training for my 3rd Boston marathon, BUT I’m not feeling very confident that I will actually finish the race this time.

While I’m definitely in much better shape (both physically and mentally) than I was 14 weeks ago and certainly capable of completing another marathon, my right foot is probably going to prevent that from happening this time around. I have a pretty nasty metatarsalgia in the ball of my right foot (inflammation of the 2nd metatarsal head), which has been bothering me a lot during my training walks. The pain generally kicks in after a few miles and gets gradually worse the farther I go. If the 21 miler I did a few weeks ago is any indication how my foot will hold up during a full marathon, it’s a sure bet I won’t finish the race.

Still, I have no plans to withdraw or cancel my trip to Boston. My lungs have been doing great the past week and I have way too much pain and sweat invested in this to back out before I even make it to the starting line. I may not be able to finish the entire race, but I plan to be there in Hopkinton with my friends on Patriots day and will complete as much of the 26.2 mile course as I can.
To increase my odds of success, I’ll be in total rest mode starting today until race day, which is 10 days from now. Who knows, maybe that will be enough time for my foot to at least partially heal.

Without even touching on the breathing or asthma implications in all this, training to run or walk a marathon is hard, and the older you get, the harder it becomes. This is a risky business and no matter how many precautions you take, s**t happens. The body wasn’t designed to withstand the constant and grueling pounding of pavement with an impact force of twice your body weight. Eventually it’s gonna catch up with you. When that happens, you can either give up and call it quits, or you can pick yourself up, make some adjustments, and continue on. I think the fact that I’ve come as far as I have, considering the obstacles I face, is because I believe in myself 100% and I’m truly passionate about everything I get involved in. I may not be a natural born athlete, but how many people do you know with severe lung disease that have completed 7 full marathons, including the Boston marathon, not once, but twice! And all within a 5 year span.

So yeah, I’m proud of myself for making it this far. If it turns out I finish the race…great! If not, no big deal.


That truly is one beautiful bridge :-)

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15 Comments

  1. kerri says:

    We're proud of you too, rockstar! :D Can't wait to see those start line pictures . . . [And you know, 'cause I'm ALWAYS an optimist, I've got fingers crossed for healing and seeing finish line pictures too!]

    Enjoy the time off training! :)

  2. kitkat07 says:

    Go Steve Go! Hopefully the rest will help :). I'm with Kerri I can't wait to see the start/finish line pics.

  3. James says:

    Yeah, like ninja Kerri said! :-) Good idea letting the feet rest. Good luck my friend! One of these days I need to try for three.

  4. Hey you guys, Thanks for your support!!!

  5. Sheree says:

    Yeah, Steve, I'm proud of you, too. Take very good care of yourself and have a fantastically fun time in Boston! Love, Sheree

  6. mymusicallungs says:

    Ack. As if the lungs weren't enough of a hurdle your body has thrown something else in to the equation. I have every faith you can beat the foot pain. Turn that iPod up and block it out, somehow, I hope!
    Good luck. When is the race? xx

    • Forgot to mention that the foot pain is being caused by a stress fracture in the head of the metatarsal bone. In other words, I have a broken toe bone.

    • Forgot to mention that the pain is being caused by a stress fracture in the head of the metatarsal bone. In other words, I have a broken toe bone. Were talking excruciating pain. Not sure I could put up with that level of pain for 7 hours:-)

  7. Gayle Myrna says:

    Hi Stephen: Congrats on completing your training…your athletic achievements are always a source of inspiration and hoping the foot issues can be managed for the race.
    P.S. thanks again for the Tune Up 4 COPD promo. Even though I fully expect to NOT win the contest, my video got a lot of views!
    Keep on keeping on!

  8. mommato2beauties says:

    I'll be cheering for you from Western MA. Unfortunately, I'll be heading to Boston on TUESDAY, so I just can't make two trips in one week. I would have loved to have cheered you on from the sidelines.

  9. Fran says:

    hey stephen,

    Just wanted to drop by and wish you luck. I wish I could be there to see you again, but alas I don't think I'm going this year. Have lots of fun!

  10. Hi Fran, Ill miss you too! Good luck on your exams!

  11. Lily says:

    You are a real inspiration. I am desolate that due to onbset of illness I can no longer flamenco or nwalk very far, but you have inspired me to see how I can maybe get round it a little. God bless!

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