Trapped in the yellow zone

We all know what it’s like to be in asthma purgatory for a few days or maybe even a few weeks, but for 2 months? Geeze, cut me some slack would ya!
Seriously, except for a string of 6 days in the middle October when I still on high doses of pred, Ive been in the yellow zone almost continuously since the beginning of September. Just just check my peak flow records. (A year ago I was blowing 360′s)


I can’t figure out if I’m still flaring from the original exacerbation that landed me in the slammer back in September, or if this is a new exacerbation, or if my lung function is irreversibly declining because of so many exacerbations. Granted, I was pretty sick during that last hospitalization, and all the emotional crap that’s ensued probably hasn’t helped matters , but Ive been much sicker than this in the past ,and it didn’t take me nearly as long to recover. I’m really beginning to wonder if I ‘ll ever get back to where I was before I got sick.

Bumping up my pred dose would probably help improve my pfs and my breathing in general, but I’m hesitant to do so, because prednisone, as much as I hate it, is one of the last drugs I have left in my breathing arsenal. If I start getting dependent on higher and higher doses to keep my lung function up, I might not ever be able to come off it. At this stage of the game, that’s basically a death sentence for me.

The worse part for though, is not being able to get out there and exercise. I feel like a prisoner being held captive by my own disease. Held in kind of a white collar crime prison where you’re given some freedom, but not all. Sure, Im breathing well enough where I can do those really slow 2 mile evening walks, but as far as the real stuff goes? the workouts I really enjoy? the walks that are 5 miles or more? Well, I just get too short of breath, and without those longer walks, I can’t really train for any races, and well……just Get me outta Here!

PS…. One of the cool things about digital pf meters, is that you can upload the results to your computer, or in my case to something called the Microsoft Health vault, where you can analyze, trend and/or share the results with others.
If you wanted to impressive your Lung doctor, you could print out a report, complete with graphs and bring it with you to your next appointment. No more having to keep a written diary.

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10 Comments

  1. kerri says:

    *hugs Mr Lovely*
    I know you've been having a rough time lately, keep hanging in there, buddy. <3

    Also, you and your digital meter are crazy organized–likey! [I couldn't tell you the last time I recorded a PF in record-form lol.] Very cool.

  2. wheezytux says:

    Sorry you been having such a tough ride and still in this yellow zone. You are making the yellow zone look cool!!!! I really hope you kick out of it soon as it must be taking its toll.

    You digital readouts etc are well smart….i think i need to invest in on of these electronic peak flow meters. I still have a mini wright philips one…i think I have had it since i was about 15 maybe. I might treat myself…but then i would ahve to spend a year working a new one out and how to get it all on a comp!!!

    Take it easy x

    • Thanks Olivia, I\’m used to it, but I\’m driving everyone around me crazy.

      The digital flow meters are cool in that you don\’t have to write anything down, but honestly, the old fashioned one are just as good.

  3. mymusicallungs says:

    I think you know I totally understand all this 'stuck around 60%' yellowness.
    I guess I've just learned to accept it. I'll embrace it positively as long as it's not red. It seems to have so become my norm that I'm not going to beat myself up any more that I never see green numbers.
    I wish you well, and I wish you some good green days before long. Chill, pal x

  4. mymusicallungs says:

    The cough is a disaster area. I'm just too warn out now. I have in fact taken a day off sick today-unbelievable for me to do that, but my Dr said I need to be resting, preferably in bed in the warm, doing nothing, and I'm just not getting any better……x

  5. HeatherK says:

    It has indeed been a horrendous year. D: Although in good news (for me anyway) I am gonna get to do my half! Now..if I can just walk off the two months of prednisone… No running for me yet because it sucks the calcium out of your bones and I'm not about to snap my foot or get a hairline tibial by jumping the gun.

    • As in Half marathon? Which one? where at? Thats great news. Hey, if I can do a full marathon with my lung function, you can certainly do a half. Dont worry about the running. Unless youre a natural born athlete, most marathon runners end up walking at least part of the distance. The main thing is that youre challenging yourself regardless of your lung problems.
      I totally understand about the prednisone too. Ive done more than one race while still on high doses of the stuff. Id worry more about muscle cramps than breaking any bones.
      Keep up the good work!

  6. HeatherK says:

    I'm doing the St. Pete Women's Half. :D I dunno about the cramps. I'm not particularly prone…but my family is very prone to osteoporosis. My doc made a point of telling me to take calcium, but since pred bothers my stomach, taking supplements and indeed, eating in general can be problematic sometimes.

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